Internal Rhyme Poems: The Christmas Elf Meets the Christmas Mouse

////Internal Rhyme Poems: The Christmas Elf Meets the Christmas Mouse

Internal Rhyme Poems: The Christmas Elf Meets the Christmas Mouse

Christmas Elf Poem

Merry Christmas to you! The Christmas Elf Meets the Christmas Mouse is an original Christmas poem I wrote using internal rhyme. At the end of The Christmas Elf Meets the Christmas Mouse are a few questions that are meant to be used to open a dialogue about Christmas wishes, the meaning of Christmas, and the simple lesson or two that Elf may have learned from this experience. I would love to hear what answers your child or grandchild had for the questions at the end.

The Christmas Elf Meets the Christmas Mouse is my first attempt at such a long poem using internal rhyme. (For more information on internal rhyme visit my post Internal Rhyme | Examples of Internal Rhyme and Lyrics.) Don’t worry – I won’t quit my day job! But I did have fun creating this Christmas poem, and that is what counts whenever we attempt something new that interests us. (The idea came to me when I met my grandchildren’s Christmas Elf on the Shelf which brought back memories of our own Christmas Mouse who lived under the house and opened the door each Christmas for Santa, since we didn’t have a fireplace.)

The Christmas Elf Meets the Christmas Mouse

Santa’s Christmas Elf was talking to himself

Something is amiss…where is little Oliver’s wish?

He looked behind the door, he looked on the floor.

It was Elf’s duty to deliver the wish to Santa for little Oliver;

he had saved for last the boy’s request because it was the best.

Santa was waiting, the Christmas Elf felt like fainting!

Thinking he musn’t give up, he heard someone say Wassup?

Around the corner Elf tried to lean without his presence seen…

Come closer to see, a quiet voice said. Oh my, it couldn’t be!

But there a tiny creature was all covered in lots of white fluffy fuzz

trimmed in red under his chin and more above his tiny hat’s brim.

Elf had heard Santa had a special helper…so was the word from Grand Elfer…

Could this creature all furry be the one who would scurry

silently across the floor on Christmas night to open the door?

Oh, no! The clock began to chime – Elf had lost track of the time.

While watching the mouse, he forgot Santa would soon be at the house.

Elf must find Oliver’s wish or Santa will know he was remiss.

With fear he shook as one more peek around the room he took…

Do I trust this mouse who scurries through the house;

what is my choice? slipped out as Elf found his voice.

I know you are upset, said Mouse. What is it your regret?

I have lost little Oliver’s wish, replied Elf. Oh, I have been remiss!

Mouse responded: Why didn’t you just speak up when I asked ‘Wassup’?

The boy’s wish I found – it must have fallen to the ground…

Mouse shook his head – the new ones he always dread…

You must be a rookie; you’ll find it next to Santa’s cookie.

Hurry! it’s getting late; over there is the plate.

There it was, little Oliver’s wish – it could not be missed!

With that, Elf wiggled his nose and shook his toes

as he thanked the mouse…then he disappeared from the house!

Elf made it back to Santa in time, and now I need help with this rhyme…

Please answer these questions…Did Christmas Elf learn a lesson?

Did the Christmas Mouse open the door? What did little Oliver wish for?

If you were Oliver, what wish would you put on the  list?

For you, my wish is a very Merry Christmas!!!

by © 2011 Barbara R Johnson
~ NanasCorner.com ~

Internal Rhyme Poems: A Christmas Wish by JA Heitmuller is another original Christmas poem using internal rhyme.

About the Author:

Grandmother of 5 great kids, retired special ed high school teacher, married since 1972 to Poppy…loves spoiling the grands, crocheting for whomever I can and charities, reading, crafts, outdoors, and blogging.

2 Comments

  1. nana 2011/12/29 at 7:48 pm

    You are very kind!

  2. Susan Adcox 2011/12/27 at 5:48 pm

    This is a fun piece, and should be a great vehicle for discussions with the grandchildren. Internal rhyme is hard and is seldom used throughout a long poem, but kudos to you for pulling it off!

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