6 Rhyming Poems for Kids | Grandparents and Grandchildren Fun

///6 Rhyming Poems for Kids | Grandparents and Grandchildren Fun

6 Rhyming Poems for Kids | Grandparents and Grandchildren Fun

Classic rhyming poems for kids to enjoy with Grandparents. Do you remember being read those everlasting classic rhyming poems for kids by your parents or grandparents? Now, as parents or grandparents, you can enjoy them again! Reading to a child helps build skills and relationships. Grandparents and grandchildren reading rhyming poems for kids together during quiet time helps create a closer bond, especially when they are shared favorite poems and stories. 

6 Rhyming Poems for Kids

The rhyming poems for kids that I have chosen to share with parents, grandparents and kids are ones that have been popular with young children through their span of over 150 years. They are fun and easy for children to visualize as they are read. We’ve read them to our children, and now we can enjoy them with our grandchildren, too! 

Rhyming Poems for Kids #1

Tumbling
~Anonymous (circa 1745)

In jumping and tumbling
We spend the whole day,
Till night by arriving
Has finished our play.

What then? One and all,
There’s no more to be said,
As we tumbled all day,
So we tumble to bed.

Rhyming Poems for Kids #2

The Star
~Jane Taylor (circa 1806)

Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveler in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark,
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut you eye,
Till the sun is in the sky.

As your bright and tiny spark,
Lights the traveler in the dark-
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.

Rhyming Poems for Kids #3

The Spider and the Fly
~Mary Howitt (circa 1821)

“Will you walk into my parlor?” said the spider to the fly;
“‘Tis the prettiest little parlor that ever you may spy.
The way into my parlor is up a winding stair,
And I have many curious things to show when you are there.”
“Oh no, no,” said the little fly; “to ask me is in vain,
For who goes up your winding stair can ne’er come down again.”

“I’m sure you must be weary, dear, with soaring up so high.
Well you rest upon my little bed?” said the spider to the fly.
“There are pretty curtains drawn around; the sheets are fine and thin,
And if you like to rest a while, I’ll snugly tuck you in!”
“Oh no, no,” said the little fly, “for I’ve often heard it said,
They never, never wake again who sleep upon your bed!”

Said the cunning spider to the fly: “Dear friend, what can I do
To prove the warm affection I’ve always felt for you?
I have within my pantry good store of all that’s nice;
I’m sure you’re very welcome – will you please to take a slice?
“Oh no, no,” said the little fly; “kind sir, that cannot be:
I’ve heard what’s in your pantry, and I do not wish to see!”

“Sweet creature!” said the spider, “you’re witty and you’re wise;
How handsome are your gauzy wings; how brilliant are your eyes!
I have a little looking-glass upon my parlor shelf;
If you’d step in one moment, dear, you shall behold yourself.”
“I thank you, gentle sir,” she said, “for what you’re pleased to say,
And, bidding you good morning now, I’ll call another day.”

The spider turned him round about, and went into his den,
For well he knew the silly fly would soon come back again:
So he wove a subtle web in a little corner sly,
And set his table ready to dine upon the fly;
Then came out to his door again and merrily did sing:
“Come hither, hither, pretty fly, with pearl and silver wing;
Your robes are green and purple; there’s a crest upon your head;
Your eyes are like diamond bright, but mine are dull as lead!”

Alas, alas! how very soon this silly little fly,
Hearing his wily, flattering words, came slowly flitting by;
With buzzing wings she hung aloft, then near and nearer grew,
Thinking only of her brilliant eyes and green and purple hue,
Thinking only of her crested head. Poor, foolish thing! at last
Up jumped the cunning spider, and fiercely held her fast;
He dragged her up his winding stair, into the dismal den –
Within his little parlor – but she ne’er came out again!

And now, dear little children, who may this story read,
To idle, silly flattering words I pray you ne’er give heed;
Unto an evil counselor close heart and ear and eye,
And take a lesson from this tale of the spider and the fly.

Rhyming Poems for Kids #4

Where Did You Come From, Baby Dear?
~George MacDonald (1824-1905)

Where did you come from, baby dear?
Out of the everywhere into here.

Where did you get your eyes so blue?
Out of the sky as I came through.

What makes the light in them sparkle and spin?
Some of the starry spikes left in.

Where did you get that little tear?
I found it waiting when I got here.

What makes your forehead so smooth and high?
A soft hand stroked it as I went by.

What makes your cheek like a warm white rose?
I saw something better than anyone knows.

Whence that three-cornered smile of bliss?
Three angels gave me at once a kiss.

Where did you get this pearly ear?
God spoke, and it came out to hear.

Where did you get those arms and hands?
Love made itself into hooks and bands.

Feet, whence did you come, you darling things?
From the same box as the cherubs’ wings.

How did they all just come to be you?
God thought about me, and so I grew.

But how did you come to us, you dear?
God thought about you, and so I am here.

Rhyming Poems for Kids #5

Two Little Kittens
~Anonymous (circa 1880)

Two little kittens, one stormy night,
Began to quarrel, and then to fight;
One had a mouse, the other had none,
And that’s the way the quarrel begun.

“I’ll have that mouse,” sad the biggest cat;
“You’ll have that mouse? We’ll see about that!”
“I will have that mouse,” said the eldest son;
“You shan’t have the mouse,” said the little one.

I told you before ’twas a stormy night
When these two little kittens began to fight;
The old woman seized her sweeping broom,
And swept the two kittens right out of the room.

The ground was covered with frost and snow,
And the two little kittens had nowhere to go;
So they laid them down on the mat at the door,
While the old woman finished sweeping the floor.

Then they crept in, as quiet as mice,
All wet with the snow, and cold as ice,
For they found it was better, that stormy night,
To lie down and sleep than to quarrel and fight.

Rhyming Poems for Kids #6

My Shadow
~Robert Lewis Stevenson from
a Child’s Garden of Verses (circa 1913)

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,
And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.
He is very, very like me, from the heels up to the head;
And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.

The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow –
Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow;
For he sometimes shoots up taller, like an india-rubber ball,
And he sometimes gets so little that there’s none of him at all.

He hasn’t got a notion of how children ought to play,
And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way.
He stays so close beside me, he’s a coward you can see;
I’d think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me!

One morning, very early, before the sun was up,
I ‘rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup;
But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy head,
Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.

About the Author:

Grandmother of 5 great kids, retired special ed high school teacher, married since 1972 to Poppy...loves spoiling the grands, crocheting for whomever I can and charities, reading, crafts, outdoors, and blogging.

3 Comments

  1. Julie Lowman 2009/08/03 at 9:41 am

    My son’s great grandmother was a school teacher in the 1930’s. She was retired when my boys were small but she established a legacy of reading and love of books with them. One particular favorite for her was to recite the “Two Little Kitten’s” poem when the boys would begin to argue. I too will have this poem framed with Ma’s picture in it to give to my son’s as a gift, just to help them remember her.

  2. Sara 2009/07/25 at 10:44 pm

    I am thrilled to find this poem which I have been trying to remember from my childhood in the 50’s. Another one I would love to find goes;
    I had a funny dream last night while I was fast asleep,
    I dreamed I dug a great big hole, as deep as deep as deep.
    And suddenly I tumbled in and down I went and down,
    till all at once I found I’d come to queen potatoes town.

    Can anyone help? Please!

  3. Debbie Heathcote 2009/05/26 at 3:43 am

    I was adopted by my great grandmother who recited the kittens poem to me.
    Later she used to recite it to my Niece.My Niece is now expecting her first baby, and i have been trying to track down this poem for her, so she may recite it to her son.(she doesn’t know I have been looking) I am going to have it printed and framed with Grandma’s picture printed on the edge with 2 of her cats as kittens,all now have passed on.This should bring a tear and a happy memory, to my Niece Dana, who wishes Grandma could have met her son.

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